About

In 2012 I learned one of the great secrets in the world of wine: that the wines made in Jerez (and Sanlucar, and Montilla), from finos and manzanillas to palo cortados, amontillados and olorosos (not to mention moscatels and PX), are among the most extraordinary, delicious wines being made anywhere. 

I had lived in Spain for over a decade and I had been enjoying wines of every kind for longer than that. I had also cottoned to the quality of the wines I had come across: I always had room in my fridge for a bottle of Tio Pepe. But I discovered, in a bottle of Palo Cortado (made by Equipo Navazos and bought at Enoteca Barolo), what seemed like a new world. It was one of those Cortes gazing out on the Pacific, watcher of the skies type moments. I discovered a whole new dimension to wine, a bass clef to go with the treble, jazz music after a lifetime of military marches. 

It is hard to explain but I feel I must do my best. For the good of the wine drinking world, and in gratitude to the hard working geniuses down in Jerez who have so enriched my cellar. 

Undertheflor. The name of the blog is inspired by the lads’ inspired description of their symptoms on the second morning of an enthusiastic trip to Jerez: all sugar, glycerine removed from bloodstream, replaced with alcohol and acetaldehide. (It also refers to the biological ageing almost unique to these wines.)

Sharquillo. The writer is a Madrid based mancunian who has become a keen drinker of sherry in all its guises. I have no commercial interest whatever, although I have a growing number of friends in the business (fortunately my over the top consumption means that on average everyone gets a turn).

Pages. You will see some pages across the top with general stuff that I try to keep updated – “Authorities” are the people you should be reading, “Drink it” lists restaurants that have a good list of sherries (all suggestions welcome), “Enjoy it” has some basics on stemware, decanting etc, “Get it” lists the people and places I buy my sherry from, “Pairings” is, erm, about pairings (and could use a little work), “Scores” can be controversial (you have been warned) and “Tunes” will probably give you a more accurate idea of my age than carbon dating.

Tags. There is also a growing cloud of topics to choose from on the right. Most are pretty explanatory but “Articles” is the tag for third party pieces whereas “Opinion” is my own opining.  My own particular obsessions are “Terroir” and “Vintage” (by which I mean wines that are made from fruit of a given year, rather than old wines in general). “Palomino” refers to the unfortified white wines made from said grape whereas “PX” refers to all the wines from the latter.

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6 thoughts on “About

  1. Sounds like you know what you’re talking about! 🙂 If you happen to head south to Sanlúcar again I’d love to join you for some wine and maybe try to learn a thing or two – all the wine tastes good to me here, but it would be nice to have a better understanding about the differences/pairings etc!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. What a wonderful blog! There is so little in-depth writing about sherry on the web (at least in English; were I not so monoglot a thicko I am sure there is plenty in Spanish) so this was a terrific find. I absolutely agree with your assessment of Emilio Hidalgo’s wines; La Panesa, Villapanes and El Tresillo are quite stupendous wines by any measure. I have a bottle of Tresillo 1874 awaiting a special occasion and I am rather jealous that you have managed to get hold of the Privilegio Palo Cortado; price and scarcity have made it one that I may have to wait a while for.

    Keep up the good work.

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    1. Many thanks indeed for your comment and great to hear you like it. There is indeed a fair bit of writing out there – I have put some links in the “authorities” page but it needs some updating. It also sounds like we have similar tastes in wine – although it is hard not to like those. Anyway, many thanks for your kind words and hope you will comment – always great to have feedback. Cheers

      Like

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